social engineering fraud    

3 Essential Domains of High Reliability Organizations

High Reliability Organizations (HROs) achieve such a status through persistent and detailed efforts to improve outcomes, even seeking “perfect reliability.” But, how do you get there from where you are?

Chassin and Loeb, writing about healthcare, have summarized the requirements into three broad domains: leadership, process, and culture. The approach these authors describe is intended to help hospitals and other healthcare organizations adopt HRO principles and performance, but it applies equally well to other types of organizations. All complex organizations seeking to improve outcome quality and reliability will have to scrutinize the same domains and begin to install changes.

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Can the Cash Processing and Transport System Become a High Reliability Organization?

A High Reliability Organization (HRO) is one that achieves desired outcomes consistently, despite operating in a highly complex environment characterized by high risks. It learns from its failures, even those unanticipated, and uses them to improve over time.

Could the Cash Processing and Transport System (CPTS) operate like an HRO? Let’s begin by determining if CPTS shares the characteristics of an HRO. Read More


5 Principles of High Reliability Organizations

High Reliability Organizations (HROs) are anomalies. They exist in the kind of very complex, fast-evolving environments where you would expect chaos to prevail. But it doesn’t. HROs are able to cope successfully with unexpected conditions. That’s what makes these unusual organizations so attractive to researchers.

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What is a High Reliability Organization?

What might be the ultimate risk management machine, is called a ‘High Reliability Organization’ (HRO). HRO can be thought of as a very advanced version of continuous quality improvement that extends to the performance of an entire organization.

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Early Identification: Key to Effective Risk Management

Risk practitioners tend to categorize risks based on the level of knowledge about the occurrence (known or unknown) and the level of knowledge about the impact (known or unknown).[1]  Known risks can be prioritized by level of impact and likelihood of occurrence and a plan forms accordingly. Read More


5 Methods to Manage Today’s Healthcare Security Environment [SlideShare]

Healthcare security professionals today are directly impacted by the reality of a rapidly changing environment. The security function, as with many others, is being asked to do more with less, while addressing a frightening range of new and increasing threats.

How can you more effectively manage today’s healthcare security environment? Our latest SlideShare presentation outlines five methods: Read More


What the Future Holds for the Healthcare Security Practitioner [SlideShare]

The healthcare security practitioner is confronted by an alarming level of violence from a wide range of threats. Many people do not understand that healthcare and social service workers are victims of violent attacks at many times the rate of other private sector workers. OSHA bulletin 3148-06R reports some Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on the issue:

  • Between 2011 and 2013, workplace assaults ranged from 23,540 to 25,630 annually.
  • 70% to 74% of these assaults occurred in healthcare and social service settings.
  • For healthcare workers, assaults were 10-11% of injuries causing days off work, compared with just 3% of injuries to all private sector employees.

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Violence in the Workplace: Healthcare Bears the Brunt [Infographic]

Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals go into the caregiving role for many reasons, but most reasons center on helping people. Unfortunately, by putting themselves in this role they also face the risks of violence.

Research published by Dr. James Phillips in the New England Journal of Medicine in April 2016 found “health care violence is an underreported, ubiquitous, and persistent problem that has been tolerated and largely ignored.”  In his research, Dr. Phillips found:

  • almost 75% of all workplace assaults between 2011 and 2013 happened in healthcare settings;
  • 1% of emergency department nurses reported physical assault during the last year; and
  • psychiatric aides experience workplace violence 69 times the national rate for all workplaces.

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5 Ways to Combat Social Engineering Attacks in Your Organization [Infographic]

Wikipedia defines social engineering, in the context of information security, as the “psychological manipulation of people into performing actions or divulging confidential information.” Our increasing reliance on vast networks of digital technology for information storage, research, controls, and transactions makes organizations highly vulnerable to social engineering fraud.

There is a strong urge to combat this risk with a technological fix like stronger encryption or better management controls. The problem is not a technical one because social engineering fraud is based on the exploitation of human interactions and human frailties.

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[Infographic] Your Hospital Security Program – A 3-Pronged Approach

Violent crime is on the rise in healthcare institutions, up 40% over two years, according to a recent NY Times article. In fact, OSHA reports serious workplace violence is up to four times more likely in healthcare environments than in private industry.

Public institutions, hospitals, and medical facilities are subject to all of the same risks and threats as other public environments, and sometimes even more. People entering healthcare facilities are injured, sick, or otherwise compromised enough to require care. Loved ones accompanying them are also generally under stress or carrying concern. This combination of circumstances creates a perfect storm for irritability, tension, and even hostility, something that falls on the hospital security program to predict, prevent, monitor, and manage when something happens.

The weight is on hospital security systems to find and use effective best practices to reduce threats and resolve issues with minimal disruption or harm, preferably maximizing prevention.

In our latest infographic we examine three primary components of healthcare security’s best practices designed to meet today’s tough requirements: a strong presence, complete visibility, and a prompt, thorough response.

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